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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
the fiscal cliff is coming soon. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: the tree is up on wall and broad, and so is the u.s. stock market. the holiday season typically is a good time for stocks. in fact, since 1950, december has been the best month of the year for the s&p 500 with the index gaining an average of 1.7%. this december is off to a good start, even though the fiscal cliff looms large over trading floors. most investors remain optimistic there will be a deal in washington before santa arrives. but floor broker teddy weisberg isn't sure where all the optimism is coming from. >> it's a real dilemma here because a lot of folks that i talk to, and customers and professionals alike, are very, very nervous. and i think they are perplexed by the lack of weakness in the market, if you will. >> reporter: economists say no deal between lawmakers and the white house by new year's could push the u.s. into recession by early next year. that dire prediction should be bad news for stocks, but investors remain unfazed. experts say stocks are more likely to move in a tight trading range in the next fe
in congress are negotiating issues around the fiscal cliff. we think it is really important that they get something done because, obviously, if tax rates go up on middle-class americans come next month, it will be bad for those middle-class americans, it is will be bad for our states, and we're concerned about both the fiscal side and the economic growth side. >> susie: so talk to us a little bit about what kind of deal you would like to see. what were you proposing to the president? >> let's put it this way, if money is just shifted from the federal government to the states, that's not really saving anything. and the president understands that. we think it is really important. recognizing if there are cuts in funds, there ought to be a corresponding reduction in some of the requirements that are put on the states. so we really, as much as anything else, wanted to make sure that our voices are heard and that as decisions are made, whether it is about taxes, whether it is about spending cuts, that they be done equitably and with our input. >> susie: your state is headquarters to many large
's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that'
: what is your hope for the second term? and first before we go there let's go to the fiscal cliff. what do you think ought to come out of an agreement between the president and john boehner? >> i make a couple comments. the first one is we've got to get this done now. not -- you know, there are people that will write or go on news shows and say we can let it lapse two weeks or something like that. that is specifically not true. we need this to get resolved now. not because jim mcinernie will say it. but because the people who work for us, their lives are in flux. and this is encredibly critical we get it done now. we need revenue. everybody knows we need rev. >> rose: so the president is right in asking for more revenue and not extending the bush tax cuts for $250,000? >> bowles simpson, there's not been one commission that says we can do this on spending cuts. i think speaker boehner is the only guy that can lead us in that. >> rose: he's got to take the republican house of representatives -- >> he's got to take the deal and i trust he can do it. >> rose: you're urging him to do it? to
. >> susie: investors will beor mn those fiscal cliff talks, and they will also be studying tomorrow's importa")jé:0@6cj& but josh feinman says the november numbers won't give an accurate picture of the labor market. he's chief economist at d.b. advisors. >> reporter: hi, josh, so you're talking about distortions in that report. tell us more. >> yes, hi, susie. i think that the hurricane sandy may distort the numbers. we've seen it in some of the other high frequency data in the last couple of weeks. keep in mind tomorrow's labor market report will report on a snapshot of the labor market taken in the middle of last month. and that's when the hurricane and its aftermath were having their effects. >> so the consensus numbers from a survey of economists, they're expecting american businesses added 110,000 jobs it to their payroll. the unemployment rate staying around 7.9%. does that sit right with you. is that what you are seeing? >> probably somewhere around that maybe a little less. one of the problems is it is hard to gauge exactly what the impact of the storm will have. we know it
't be happy about it. >> reporter: as lawmakers rush to rescue the economy from the fiscal cliff emergency, they have focused -- as have we thus far -- on itemized deductions. but when it comes to tax breaks or preferences, says robert... >> not just deductions. it includes things like exclusion from income, the biggest one of which is the we don't tax you on the premiums your employer pays for the health insurance we get. much bigger than anything on the deduction side. it's not the only exclusion we have. the exclusion of all the contributions to the retirement plans, your 401(k), your irks r.a., also very, very large. >> reporter: we're not going to start counting as income the money that our employer puts in for our medical insurance, are we? or for that matter, we're not going to get rid of the exclusion for putting money into a 401(k) to deaver taxation but encourage us to save more. >> it's pretty unlikely we'll count all of that income. we're already scheduled to count some of the premiums paid your employers. in 2018 the obama care will start taxing the very highest premiums, the
in the coming days. online we have a report from our partners at kaiser health news on how the fiscal cliff could affect health care for the military and for medicare patients. >> brown: next, a potential crisis of a different kind, one that has new urgency after hurricane sandy and that also involves federal spending: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, travel
are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)